Pakistan Flood: Infectious diseases in the aftermath of monsoon flooding | Lives of 50 lakh Pakistanis are at stake! This big danger is standing on the left in the midst of the flood

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 Pakistan Flood: Infectious diseases in the aftermath of monsoon flooding |  Lives of 50 lakh Pakistanis are at stake!  This big danger is standing on the left in the midst of the flood


Image Source : AP
The situation in Pakistan is getting worse due to floods.

Highlights

  • Monsoon rains have wreaked havoc across Pakistan.
  • The people affected by the floods are also struggling for ration.
  • The risk of people getting sick during floods is also increasing.

Pakistan Flood: The havoc of floods continues in Pakistan for the last several days. A large number of people have not only lost their lives, but lakhs of people have been displaced and there has been a loss of trillions of rupees. Pakistan, which is battling all the troubles, is appealing to all the countries of the world for help. Meanwhile, experts have warned that some 5 million people, including children, could fall ill from water and vector-borne diseases such as typhoid and diarrhea in the next 4 to 12 weeks in flood-hit areas of Pakistan.

1100 dead due to floods in Pakistan

Monsoon rains have wreaked havoc across Pakistan, killing nearly 1,100 people and destroying standing crops. there, which natural wrath have survived, they are facing health related problems. Health officials say the situation is critical, with people living in flood-affected areas of Sindh, Balochistan, southern Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa vulnerable to diarrhoea, cholera, intestinal or stomach irritation, typhoid and vector-borne diseases such as dengue and malaria. There is danger.

Pakistan Flood, Pakistan Floods Infectious Diseases, Pakistan Floods Diseases, Pakistan floods

Image Source : AP

After a few days, outbreaks of diseases can spread in many areas.

’50 lakh people at risk of getting sick’
Experts have said that it is estimated that medicines and equipment worth one billion rupees will be needed initially to deal with this epidemic. Pakistan The News International, quoting Dr. Shahzad Ali, a reputed public health expert and vice-chancellor of the Health Services Academy, Islamabad, wrote, ‘Monsoon rains across the country and Flooding About 33 million people have been affected by the virus, it is estimated that about 5 million people, including children, will fall ill in the next four to 12 weeks due to water and vector-borne diseases.

‘Typhoid cholera vaccine will have to be given’
Dr. Shahzad Ali said, “There is no clean drinking water available in the flood affected areas and there is a risk of diseases like diarrhoea, cholera, typhoid, intestinal and stomach irritation, dengue and malaria. Children are at higher risk of getting sick due to weak immunity. If precautionary measures are not taken, hundreds of children can die from diarrhea and other diseases. All people in flood-affected areas need to be vaccinated against typhoid-cholera immediately. These vaccines are available in the country and this can prevent deaths due to these diseases in Sindh and Balochistan.

Pakistan Flood, Pakistan Floods Infectious Diseases, Pakistan Floods Diseases, Pakistan floods

Image Source : AP

Monsoon rains have wreaked havoc in most parts of Pakistan.

‘Children are also at risk of getting measles’
According to Dr. Rana Muhammad Safdar, former health director and specialist in infectious diseases, children living in flood-affected areas are the most vulnerable and need more attention. He said that the access of the vaccination program should be ensured to those children who have not been vaccinated. Dr. Safdar said, ‘Apart from diarrhea and other water-borne diseases, children are also at risk of getting measles and it can spread like wildfire to displaced population. Polio is another menace and unfortunately Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and many cities of Punjab are witnessing polio virus infection. It can engulf other cities as well.

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