Putin is making a new strategy to surround Ukraine, instructions given to these people for military duty – Putin is making a new strategy to surround Ukraine

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Putin is making a new strategy to surround Ukraine, instructions given to these people for military duty - Putin is making a new strategy to surround Ukraine


Image Source : India TV
Russia-Ukraine War

Highlights

  • There have been many more victims of recent war incidents.
  • Estimates have caused up to 50,000 casualties so far.
  • Russian soldiers’ performance in Ukraine war is useless

Russia-Ukraine War: Fares for flights out of Russia have been increased dramatically in 24 hours. After this announcement by Putin, protests have started in about 30 cities and towns of Russia. According to a media report, doctors, teachers and bank personnel have been asked to contribute to the army. Ukraine’s advance in this war has dealt a severe blow to Russia. Due to which Putin can now call in an additional 300,000 soldiers from his reserve forces. It is being told about the intention behind this that they are trying to try to change the direction of the war.

no shortage of human resources

There are several types of ‘human resources’ in the Russian army. For example, the indentured soldier. There is a big difference between professionals who enlist for several years and forced soldiers who perform compulsory military service for one year. Then there are reserve soldiers, these are the people who have served as sepoys and maintain a certain degree of readiness, who have 25 million soldiers. Unlike professional soldiers, who serve as volunteers, many Russian soldiers are soldiers serving compulsory service. The training Russian soldiers receive is in question, and the more affluent and knowledgeable Russians generally want to avoid this process due to the brutal nature of the environment. Due to Ukraine’s ‘Special Military Operations’ status, Russia has limited options as to whom it can send.

Reserve soldiers also took part in the war
Reserve troops have largely participated in the war voluntarily. The Russian armed forces are not like most modern professional armies. The diversity of its troops is a reminder of the country’s Soviet past. There is nothing inherently wrong with using different types of troops, and many nations do it effectively. In the case of Russia, it has failed to modernize its flawed and deeply unpopular recruitment model, which has paid off. Public spending is reduced in exchange for the illusion of power. This new partial mobilization operation helps Russia call in its reserve personnel, which it will select from a large portion of its former troops to replenish its dwindling forces in Ukraine.

Russian soldiers’ performance in Ukraine war was useless
Russia will no longer have to rely on volunteers. It is of course a tacit acknowledgment that Russia is not conducting a ‘special military operation’, but is engaging in a full-scale war. As well as allowing more troops to be deployed, this mobilization seeks to create a sense of patriotism by linking the current conflict to its experience in World War II.

This makes him feel that perhaps there will be support within the country, although in reality it is having the opposite effect. Although support for the war in Russia is high, the general public is generally largely untouched by the realities of the conflict. But this mobilization, whether partial or otherwise, could change that. The performance of the Russian army in Ukraine has not been good. Britain’s military sources estimate there have been up to 50,000 casualties, with many more victims of recent war events.

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